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International Warehouse Logistics Association

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Political Action Committee

Warehouse Advocacy Fund

Sustainability Council

Diversity

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Political Action Committee

Why does IWLA have a political action committee?

Active engagement in the political process is an important means of protecting our business, employee and shareholder interests. The size and scope of government continued to increase and grow more complex. Governments decide how business is conducted and public policy decisions made in one industry sector often reverberate in many other sectors. State governments lead the charge in legislative activity. As a leader in the warehouse logistics industry and the business community, it is critical that we be engaged and maintain a robust, effective PAC.

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Does the IWLA-PAC report its contributions and expenditures?

Yes. IWLA-PAC operations are transparent and compliant with all applicable laws. Because they are regulated by the Federal Election Commission (FEC) and state and local election agencies, PACs are considered the most transparent form of political involvement. As required by law, PAC activity is publicly disclosed on the FEC and state election agency websites. 

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What are the IWLA-PAC’s contribution criteria?

IWLA-PAC support is based on candidates’ positions on legislative issues and sustained constituent relationships. The IWLA-PAC generally does not contribute to presidential candidates; industry, association or leadership PACs; or multiple candidates running in the same race.

The IWLA-PAC assures transparency. All IWLA-PAC contributions to candidates follow these five principles:

  1. The individual must serve on a key committee of jurisdiction to our industry.
  2. The individual must have a direct relationship with an IWLA member (or we are positioned to build a direct relationship).
  3. The individual must have a positive attitude toward the industry.
  4. IWLA has members in the congressional district or state.
  5. IWLA-PAC participation will make a difference – at a level that leaves an impression.

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Who decides where IWLA-PAC money goes?

The IWLA-PAC divides contributors into two tiers of membership. Tier I members participate in regular stakeholder meetings, handle the PAC priorities and budget, and decide on allocation of funds. Tier II members receive all IWLA-PAC communications, invitations to fundraisers and events and access to the IWLA-PAC website. 

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Who can participate in the IWLA-PAC?

While all members’ employees who are U.S. citizens or who are permanent green card holders are eligible to participate, only those employees who are Band IV and above (associate directors) are solicited.

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Warehouse Advocacy Fund

Why is the IWLA Warehouse Advocacy Fund important?

With your help in funding the Warehouse Advocacy Fund, our industry will cultivate more allies, build the reputation of the supply chain sector in the legislative and regulatory process, and promote regulatory rightness within our industry. We must push back with assertive and fact-based advocacy campaigns that will effectively counteract attacks and inform/educate policymakers.

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How does the WAF differ from IWLA’s Government Affairs activities?

The IWLA Warehouse Advocacy Fund is funded by corporate contributions, separate from member dues, and directed by the companies that contribute to the fund. By comparison, IWLA’s government affairs program is funded by dues and directed by IWLA’s Government Affairs Council.

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Is the Warehouse Advocacy Fund an IWLA member benefit?

The WAF is funded by members independent of normal annual dues. A fee schedule is based on the annual revenue a member derives from warehousing and related business. While all IWLA members will benefit from the success of the WAF, the WAF is governed by those companies that contribute to it.

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How does the WAF direct funds?

The WAF is driven by four guiding objectives:

  1. Commission intellectually rigorous and credible studies from non-partisan Class I Research Academic Institutions that have a supply chain discipline.
  2. Leverage the research mentioned above with a public relations resource to deploy a communications campaign to the general media, Congressmen, regulators, and regulatory boards.
  3. Retain legal counsel to develop briefs in regulatory/legal proceedings as required where the industry’s legal protection is in question.
  4. Engage additional grassroots resources on an issue-by-issue basis to realize our goals.
  5. Develop special education programs to inform/update IWLA members.

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WAF contributions:

  • Will be used directly and only for those activities voted on by the funding participants for new research and advocacy that benefit our industry.
  • Are directed by those who contribute at the tier 1 level will approve funding priorities.

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What are the contribution levels?

Your contribution is based on annual revenues. The following is the funding schedule for Tier 1, this year of the launch. The amount of work commissioned each year will ascertain the budget for the coming year and the levels of subscription.

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Sustainability Council

What is sustainability?

There is no single established definition for “sustainability”. The IWLA council will help you decide how to best define it to meet your organization’s needs. Sustainability is different from the environmental movement in that it recognizes the need for a healthy economy. 

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How can a business be more sustainable?

Optimizing the economic, social and environmental needs of a business in a way that meets the company’s immediate needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs. Sustainability helps us understand the interdependencies between the economic social and environmental demands faced by every business in a way that allows us to make better decisions for our employees today and in the future. 

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What is the importance of sustainability in business today?

Sustainability is no longer a fringe issues. The fastest growing segment of the energy sector is wind power, in the travel industry, its eco-tourism; in the investment community, it’s socially responsible investments; in agriculture, it’s organic farming.

However it is defined, it is becoming clear that sustainability has a tangible bottom line impact on today’s businesses and sustainability initiatives constantly reveal new sources of competitive advantage to their champions. More and more these initiatives are having a defining impact on how businesses think, act, manage and compete.

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Why should your organization make “sustainability” a strategic objective?

Top five reasons for making sustainability a strategic objective:

  1. Sustainability affects all aspects of a company’s operations, from development, manufacturing, sales, support and culture.
  2. Sustainability creates value over the short and long term.
  3. Stakeholders want to engage with companies that have sustainability initiatives.
  4. Solutions to the challenges of sustainability are interdisciplinary.
  5. Sustainable environments are more efficient, safer and produce cost savings over the long-term. 

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What are the indirect benefits of sustainability?

  • Differentiate your company.
  • Sidestep future regulation.
  • Attract and retain the best employees.
  • Improve your image with shareholders and the public.
  • Reduce legal risk and insurance costs.
  • Provide a higher quality of life for communities and employees. 

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What are the indirect losses of a non-sustainable environment?

  • Liability for pollutants.
  • Supply chain inefficiencies.
  • Legal problems.
  • Damaged brand image/poor public perception.
  • Unattainable to certain markets.
  • Higher operational costs. 

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Diversity

What is diversity and inclusion?

Diversity means difference. In business, diversity is the way in which individuals within and outside of a company or organization differ from one another. This includes physical characteristics, life experiences, work division, job responsibilities, family status, and all other pertinent characteristics that make each individual unique.

Inclusion in business is the extent to which a company manages, integrates, and leverages its diversity.  This includes how well individuals’ or groups’ experiences, ideas, perspectives, needs, and talents are recognized, sought, respected, and/or developed by the company. Of particular emphasis is the degree to which people from groups underrepresented in positions of leadership are afforded the opportunity to advance within a company.

Typically, but not always, diversity and inclusion (D&I) work in tandem as part of an overall business strategy.

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Why does IWLA support greater diversity and inclusion?

  1. The IWLA Mission: Diversity and inclusion directly enhances the IWLA mission. The logistics industry engages a highly diverse workforce; yet there are few paths to guide individuals to the positions of leadership in the IWLA and the profession. IWLA has an excellent opportunity to demonstrate to the industry and to society how one industry can and does promote diversity and inclusion.
     
  2. The Revenue Case for IWLA: Diversity and inclusion open new markets for IWLA membership and membership participation. Diversity and inclusion provide wider market connections, increased recognition in under-served markets and loyal members who pay dues year after year.
     
  3. The Leadership Case for IWLA: Greater diversity within the IWLA organization and volunteers brings more potential links to business, community, and government leaders, allowing IWLA to better take the pulse of societal actions, to reach out to communities and industries, including emerging and under­served regions and markets, and consequently attract new members as leaders.
     
  4. Expanding Opportunities: Diversity is about empowerment and creating color, gender, economic and national origin blind opportunities for under-represented individuals to advance in the organization and its governance.

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Why should my company have a diversity and inclusion program?

  1. Reduce Employee Recruitment Costs and Turnover: Our members can achieve a high quality, satisfied and dedicated workforce. Our members draw from a semi-skilled workforce for the majority of positions, particularly in logistical centers. A workforce that sees respect for cultural diversity and identifies an inclusive path for advancement will have lower turnover, lower absenteeism, and higher productivity and be identified as the place to work.
     
  2. Increase Market Awareness: A diverse and inclusive management team will have members who challenge conventional wisdom and will advocate for less well known market strategies, particularly when trying to access an under-served market.
     
  3. Become a Recognized Member of the Local Community: Logistical centers tend to be in or near urban areas because of our needed access to population centers. Local businesses and local media will be drawn to a business that is committed to job growth and retention and is known to reach out to the community in a manner that understands their values and interests.
     
  4. Increase Customer Base: Businesses that practice diversity and inclusion are more likely to increase their potential customer base because they can now appeal to the full range of American and Canadian shippers, receivers and related customers. Inherent cultural barriers are met and addressed by matching client experiences with the company's experience.

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Who, within a company, is responsible for implementation of diversity and inclusion initiatives?

Within companies, the individual(s) responsible for managing diversity and inclusion initiatives varies.

  • In some companies, responsibility falls to the president/CEO.
  • In others it is the Human Resources unit/division/department/manager.
  • Larger companies might have a Director of Diversity or Chief Diversity Officer. Or they might assign the diversity and inclusion program to an executive team or internal or external diversity council.
  • Some companies assign D&I to their Board of Directors.

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How are diversity and inclusion programs being implemented and managed?

Generally, to be fully effective, the diversity and inclusion initiatives need to be embraced by and clearly communicated from the highest levels of the company. Formal and informal practices and policies need to reflect the company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Diversity and inclusion implementation and management strategies include:

  • Taking a diversity inventory or needs assessment to explore current levels of diversity and inclusion, identify areas for growth, and determine resources necessary to achieving growth.
  • Incorporating diversity and inclusion into the company’s mission, vision statement, and/or strategic goals.
  • Creating a well-articulated action plan with defined goals and reasonable objectives with clearly delineated steps to be taken to reach them within a reasonable timeline.
  • Utilizing a comprehensive evaluation plan to measure progress.
  • Developing a training plan to educate all employees about the initiative and to provide them with necessary tools.
  • Creating a pipeline to leadership opportunities for people from underrepresented groups.
  • Utilizing resource/affinity groups to enhance inclusion and develop talent.
  • Seeking greater diversity at the board level.
  • Extending community outreach, including partnerships opportunities with local schools, colleges, and universities.
  • Establishing a supplier diversity program.

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